The Artist and the Micro Narrative.

Velocity

The introduction of the internet and subsequent development of multimedia authoring applications has provided non-programmers with the means to create and publish content on the World Wide Web. Thus making the publication of digital narratives increasingly accessible to the general public.

As the world becomes linked via high-speed communication devices, we see the emergence of a digital culture that is able to communicate beyond borders, boundaries and social networks. The world arguably becomes smaller as we share our lives and experiences via a wide variety of networked communication portals.

The construction and publication of personal narrative perform a necessary role in creating a forum for self expression in a media saturated environment. The phone becomes an extension of the self, allowing the exchange of narratives and blurring conventional notions of the public and the private. And it is our very need to share the human experience that will perhaps drive the need to establish a narrative that acknowledges the parameters of the mobile device.

So what are the cultural implications of a networked society, and how does this technology alter our perceptions of narrative?

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In my mobile project “Globaleyes”, I set out to explore the subject of globalisation. Would a networked world provide a greater understanding of World culture, or simply become a distribution tool for Imperialist or Corporate cultures?
Globaleyes is a concept exploring the convergence of new media technology and its relationship with the emergence of a global identity.

As the world becomes linked via high-speed communication devices, we see the emergence of a global culture that is able to communicate beyond cultural boundaries and stereotypes. The world arguably becomes smaller as we share our lives and experiences via a wide variety of networked communication portals.

In a post September 11 environment where conservative politics have given rise to a fear of difference, the other is viewed with suspicion in a manner that echoes our colonial past. We forget about the strength and commonality we share, and how multiculturalism has enriched our lives.

Beginning with the image of an Anglo-Saxon man’s face, Globaleyes uses the visual metaphor of the police identikit to subvert notions of the criminal other by offering the viewer a kaleidoscope of facial features that are constantly merging and morphing within the screen space. It may be a Chinese girl’s eyes, a Turkish man’s smile or an Egyptian lady’s nose that slots into place. What begins as a portrait of our colonial past transforms into a rapidly changing image that challenges claims of a dominant or finite cultural identity.

Globaleyes is a virtual mirror-scape that allows us to see a part of ourselves within the
constructed visual representation of identity. No matter what age, religion or culture, together we share a common humanity.

Globaleyes can be viewed at the following links:
http://www.mediamongrel.com.au/pages/frameset.html
http://www.fastflix.tv/flixmaker.html

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~ by Dean on April 7, 2006.

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